What Are Homophones Give 5 Examples?

Can you give me a list of homophones?

Common Homophones Listmademaidonewonpairpearpeacepieceplainplane34 more rows.

What are homophones give 10 examples?

Examples of Homophonesad, addate, eightaunt, antbe, beeblew, bluebuy, by, byecell, sellhear, herehour, ourits, it’s4 more rows

What is the most confusing sentence?

Take a guess at what this sentence means – “Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo.” It really has a proper meaning. And it’s part of a whole group of one-word sentences.

What are the 20 examples of homophones?

20 Example of Homophones1AdAdd2BallBawl3CaretCarrot4DualDuel5EyeI2 more rows

What are their there and they’re called?

Their is the possessive pronoun, as in “their car is red”; there is used as an adjective, “he is always there for me,” a noun, “get away from there,” and, chiefly, an adverb, “stop right there”; they’re is a contraction of “they are,” as in “they’re getting married.”

Which word has the most homonyms?

Bow (verb) and bough are among the most common in English, according to Yahoo. what word in the English language has the most homonyms?…aer-, prefix: “air-related”.air, verb: to publicly discuss. … aire, obsolete spelling of air (noun, a tune or melody).Aire: river in northern England.More items…

What is the most confusing word?

9 English Word Pairs That Confuse Absolutely EveryoneLose and Loose. We spell them differently and we pronounce them differently, but English speakers still use these words incorrectly. … Resign and Re-sign. This one is a little tougher. … Advice and Advise. … Affect and Effect. … Compliment and Complement. … Disinterested and Uninterested. … Bear and Bare. … Further and Farther.More items…

How many types of homophones are there?

five different typesThere are five different types of homophone: Homograph – Some homophones are similar in spelling, but different in meanings. They are called homographs. For instance, “hail” meaning an ice storm, and “hail” meaning something that occurs in large numbers, such as “a hail of bullets.”

What are confusing words?

(printable version here) Words that sound alike or nearly alike but have different meanings often cause writers trouble. Here are a few of the most common pairs with correct definitions and examples: Accept / Except.

What are homophones with example?

A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same (to varying extent) as another word but differs in meaning. A homophone may also differ in spelling. The two words may be spelled the same, as in rose (flower) and rose (past tense of rise), or differently, as in rain, reign, and rein.

What are similar sounding words?

Words that having similar sounds are called homonyms. Within the category of homonyms are two commonly confused concepts: homographs and homophones. Homographs are words that are may have the same spelling, but have different meanings and that may have different pronunciations.

What is the hardest word to spell?

Top 10 hardest words to spellMisspell. Let the misspelling begin with the misspelled word misspell. … Pharaoh. This misspelled word falls into the error category of ‘you spell it like it sounds’. … Weird. Fear the confusing power of the’ I before E’! … Intelligence. … Pronunciation. … Handkerchief. … logorrhea. … Chiaroscurist.More items…•

What is a rhyming word?

A rhyme is a repetition of similar sounds (usually, exactly the same sound) in the final stressed syllables and any following syllables of two or more words. … Furthermore, the word rhyme has come to be sometimes used as a shorthand term for any brief poem, such as a rhyming couplet or nursery rhyme.

How do you use homophones in a sentence?

Some common examples of homophones, including the words used in a sentence, are: brake/break: When teaching my daughter how to drive, I told her if she didn’t hit the brake in time she would break the car’s side mirror. cell/sell: If you sell drugs, you will get arrested and end up in a prison cell.

What are homophones give five examples?

Sometimes, homophones are even spelled and sound exactly the same but still have different meanings: ‘rose’ (the flower) and ‘rose’ (past tense of rise); ‘lie’ (to tell an untruth) and ‘lie’ (to lie down); ‘bear’ (the animal) and ‘bear’ (to put up with) are more examples of homophones.