Question: What Is A Homograph Mean?

What is Homograph and give example?

Homographs are words that have same spelling but can be used in different meanings and/or pronunciations.

For examples – wind, bear, founded, wound, row, evening, bat etc… Some common homographs.

Wind.

The usual pronunciation is similar to ‘I’ in the words ‘is’ or ‘in’..

What are some examples of Homographs?

Homograph Examplesagape – with mouth open OR love.bass – type of fish OR low, deep voice.bat – piece of sports equipment OR an animal.bow – type of knot OR to incline.down – a lower place OR soft fluff on a bird.entrance – the way in OR to delight.evening – smoothing out OR after sunset.fine – of good quality OR a levy.More items…

What are homonyms give 5 examples?

Homonym ExamplesAddress – to speak to / location.Air – oxygen / a lilting tune.Arm – body part / division of a company.Band – a musical group / a ring.Bark – a tree’s out layer / the sound a dog makes.Bat – an implement used to hit a ball / a nocturnal flying mammal.More items…

Is live a Homograph?

A homograph is a word that has the same spelling as another word but crucially has an alternative pronunciation and meaning. … An example of a homograph is “Live”.

Is evening a Homograph?

The definition of a homograph is a word that is spelled like another word or other words, but has a different meaning and sometimes sounds different. An example of a homograph is evening, which is the time of day after the sun has set or making something level or flat.

What are homonyms explain with example?

A homonym is a word that has the same spelling and sound as another word, but a different meaning. For example, saw (a cutting tool) and saw (the past tense of see) are homonyms. They have the same spelling and sound but different meanings.

Is back a Homograph?

Homograph definition: In English, homographs are words with the same spelling but having more than one meaning. Homograph examples: back-back.

Is read a Homograph?

Homographs are words that are spelled the same but have different meanings. … The OED would not consider “read” to be a homograph, however, because, while the present and past tense of the verb are pronounced differently, they share the same contextual origin.

Is fish a Homograph?

The word homograph merges homos, the Greek word for “same,” with graph, “to write.” If two words are written identically but don’t share a meaning, they are homographs. Some examples are close (“to shut”) and close (“nearby”); and bass (“deep”) and bass (“the fish”).

What is polysemy and example?

When a symbol, word, or phrase means many different things, that’s called polysemy. The verb “get” is a good example of polysemy — it can mean “procure,” “become,” or “understand.” Generally, polysemy is distinguished from simple homonyms (where words sound alike but have different meanings) by etymology. …

What are Homographs in English?

noun. Each of two or more words spelled the same but not necessarily pronounced the same and having different meanings and origins. For example, bow and bow. Compare with homonym, homophone. ‘They may, however, be put off by homographs and polysemous words, such as the various uses of ‘bank’ and ‘crane’.

What are the 20 examples of homophones?

Homophonesaccessary, accessory.ad, add.ail, ale.air, heir.aisle, I’ll, isle.all, awl.allowed, aloud.alms, arms.More items…

Why are Homographs confusing?

Homographs represent another category of words that frequently confuse English users. They are groups (usually pairs) of words that might or might not have the same spelling (generally they do), but are pronounced differently according to their meaning.

Is hide a Homograph?

The words hide, hied sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Why do hide, hied sound the same even though they are completely different words? The answer is simple: hide, hied are homophones of the English language.

How do we use homonyms?

Pure homonyms are words that have the same spelling and pronunciation, but different meanings (denotation). For example: You can sit on the bank (noun) of a river and you can visit a bank (noun) to pay your bills. You might plant (verb) a tree and then buy some plants (noun) from the garden centre.